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Tor and the Deep Web: Bitcoin, DarkNet & Crypto...
9,95 € *
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The ultimate Tor/Darknet guide for 2017-2018 just got better! Just three questions you need to ask yourself:  Do you value privacy? Do you value freedom? Do you want to be anonymous? If you answered yes to any of the above, this is your audiobook. Instant anonymity, right now, can be yours for the taking. As science fiction author Hugh Howey once stated: When pursuing a dream, don't wait.  People sling words across the Internet without regard for their future. They don't know it but they are digging their own graves by attacking Goliath without a shield. Every word you say on forums, Usenet, Facebook, and news outlets is out there forever whether you are Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, Green Party, or bachelor party. Doesn't matter which one. One day you may wake up to discover a state power wants a "type" of voter out of the equation altogether: You.  How do you erase every critical forum comment you ever made? How do you scrub your Facebook page? How do you make anonymous online comments so that your new employer doesn't fire you? Enter Tor. This is the ultimate guide with easy take-you-by-the-hand instructions to teach you not only Tor, but VPNs, Bitcoins, hacking, Darknet personas and even how to evade the Sauronic eye that is the NSA. Yes. This book kills NSA spying dead.  Comment anonymously on any website Tor browser, Freenet, I2P, and all alternatives Cryptocurrency - how to buysell anonymously Encryption guide: PGP. Veracrypt. Email. Linux. Windows. Macs. Kali. Android. Phones. Online privacy no matter where you are Hacking for beginners on the Darknet  Edward Snowden's biggest mistake Master the art of invisibility today!   1. Language: English. Narrator: James C. Lewis. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/101335/bk_acx0_101335_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 29.05.2020
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Haskell
66,99 € *
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Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 29.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Haskell
66,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 29.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Developing Web Applications with UML and Javasc...
49,95 € *
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Today, web applications are the most important type of software applications. This textbook shows how to design and implement them, using a model-based engineering approach that covers general information management concepts and techniques and the two most relevant technology platforms: JavaScript and Java. The book provides an in-depth tutorial for theory-underpinned and example-based learning by doing it yourself, supported by quiz questions and practice projects. Volume 1 provides an introduction to web technologies and model-based web application engineering, discussing the information management concepts of constraint-based data validation, enumerations and special datatypes. Volume 2 discusses the advanced information management concepts of associations and inheritance in class hierarchies. Web apps are designed using UML class diagrams and implemented with two technologies: JavaScript for front-end (and distributed NodeJS) apps, and Java (with JPA and JSF) for back-end apps. The six example apps discussed in the book can be run, and their source code downloaded, from the book's website. Gerd Wagner is Professor of Internet Technology at Brandenburg University of Technology, Germany, and Adjunct Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA. He works in the areas of web engineering and modeling and simulation. Mircea Diaconescu is a Software Architect and Technical Team Leader at Entri GmbH, Berlin. He enjoys to work with the newest web technologies and to build Web of Things projects. Java, JavaScript/NodeJS and C# are his favorite programming languages.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 29.05.2020
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Multi-Paradigm Programming using C++
112,98 € *
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An Introduction to Multi-Paradigm Programming using C++ is a self-contained reference book for those studying and using C++. Starting from scratch, Dirk Vermeir explains the idea of address, value and type in C++ before quickly moving on to cover the more important aspects of the language such as classes, templates, generic programming and inheritance. He includes recent developments in C++, such as STL and the iostream library, and there is also a chapter devoted to program design principles. By using plenty of examples to illustrate the text, the reader is stimulated and inspired to see how they can use what they have learnt in other more sophisticated applications. All the examples from the text, including some larger example programs are available on the author's website - http://tinf2.vub.ac.be/cpp/index.html

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 29.05.2020
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Transcend JetFlash 850 USB-Stick 32 GB USB Typ-...
16,08 € *
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Transcend's JetFlash 850 flash drive utilizes the next-generation Type-C connector with USB OTG (On-The-Go) technology for use with devices featuring USB Type-C ports. The device sports an ergonomic curve grip design. With a free download of Transcend Elite software for PCs and application for mobile devices included, you can more easily manage and back up files stored on the JetFlash 850. Reversible USB Type-C connector Transcend's JetFlash 850 comes with the latest USB Type-C connector for greater ease of use. It is reversibly-oriented and compatible with next-generation devices, such as smartphones, tablets and computers. Unparalleled transfer speeds Equipped with the SuperSpeed USB 3.1 Gen 1 interface, the JetFlash 850 delivers transfer speeds of up to 130MB/s, meaning lightning-fast access to your data. Ergonomic curve grip design Transcend's JetFlash 850 features an ergonomic design, with a slightly curved grip for easier, more natural user experience. A lanyard hole is provided for attaching the device to your suitcase or bags, making the JetFlash 850 readily accessible while still looking trendy. A cap is included to protect the USB connector from being accidentally broken. Splashproof and dust resistant Using innovative COB (Chip on Board) technology and assembled with a metallic casing, the JetFlash 850 is completely resistant to dust and splash while remaining lightweight. Transcend Elite software and application Transcend Elite is advanced software compatible with both Mac OS X and Windows to help you manage data. Download the software from our website for free, or the app from Google Play for Android devices. Transcend Elite's features include: backup and restore, data encryption, bookmark sync, and cloud backup.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 29.05.2020
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Transcend JetFlash 850 USB-Stick 64 GB USB Typ-...
22,65 € *
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Transcend's JetFlash 850 flash drive utilizes the next-generation Type-C connector with USB OTG (On-The-Go) technology for use with devices featuring USB Type-C ports. The device sports an ergonomic curve grip design. With a free download of Transcend Elite software for PCs and application for mobile devices included, you can more easily manage and back up files stored on the JetFlash 850. Reversible USB Type-C connector Transcend's JetFlash 850 comes with the latest USB Type-C connector for greater ease of use. It is reversibly-oriented and compatible with next-generation devices, such as smartphones, tablets and computers. Unparalleled transfer speeds Equipped with the SuperSpeed USB 3.1 Gen 1 interface, the JetFlash 850 delivers transfer speeds of up to 130MB/s, meaning lightning-fast access to your data. Ergonomic curve grip design Transcend's JetFlash 850 features an ergonomic design, with a slightly curved grip for easier, more natural user experience. A lanyard hole is provided for attaching the device to your suitcase or bags, making the JetFlash 850 readily accessible while still looking trendy. A cap is included to protect the USB connector from being accidentally broken. Splashproof and dust resistant Using innovative COB (Chip on Board) technology and assembled with a metallic casing, the JetFlash 850 is completely resistant to dust and splash while remaining lightweight. Transcend Elite software and application Transcend Elite is advanced software compatible with both Mac OS X and Windows to help you manage data. Download the software from our website for free, or the app from Google Play for Android devices. Transcend Elite's features include: backup and restore, data encryption, bookmark sync, and cloud backup.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 29.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Multi-Paradigm Programming using C++
153,00 CHF *
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Aimed mainly at students, this self-contained reference book on C++ is of superb educational value. Starting from scratch, Vermeir explains the idea of address, value and type in C++ before quickly moving on to cover the more important aspects of the language such as classes, templates, generic programming and inheritance. He includes recent developments in C++, such as STL and the iostream library. There is also a chapter devoted to program design principles. By using plenty of examples the reader is stimulated and inspired to see how they can use what they have learnt in other more sophisticated applications. All the examples from the text, including some larger example programs are available on the author's website.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 29.05.2020
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STL for C++ Programmers
244,00 CHF *
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'It is the first book that I have read that makes STL quickly usable by working programmers' Francis Glassborow, Chair of The Association of C & C++ Users (ACCU) STL for C++ programmers Leen Ammeraal The Standard Template Library (STL) provides many useful and generally applicable programming tools. This book combines reference material and a well-paced tutorial to get you past the basics quickly. Small, complete programs illustrate the key STL features such as containers, algorithms, iterators and function objects. A section is devoted to the new string data type. All STL algorithms are formally presented by their prototypes and then informally described to show how to use them in practice. Concepts are well illustrated with a large number of example programs all of which are available via ftp (for access details please refer to the preface of the book or Wiley s website). Finally, special examples are given to explain the advanced notions of function objects and function adaptors, including predicates, binders and negators.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 29.05.2020
Zum Angebot